Legendario 7yo Elixer de Cuba

CUBA / 0.70 liter, 34%

Aantal: 2
Legendario’s base rum is aged and blended in tiers of American oak barrels, apparently in a solera system of two, four and six year old rums.  Before bottling, the rum is reduced from 47% ABV to 34% ABV by diluting with water and blending with raisins that were macerated in demineralized (distilled) water for 30 days. Legendario referes to Elixir de Cuba as “Punch au Rhum”, which translated loosely from French means a flavored rum. 

TASTING NOTES
Extremely Smooth. Legendario 7 Años Elixir de Cuba is much darker in color than I would expect from a rum colored only by aging seven years in oak barrel, but a noble shade of aged copper patina or walnut-wood nonetheless. A considerable amount of fine sediment is suspended in the rum (probably particles of macerated raisins), contributing to the deeper color. In any event, the particulates settled slowly to the bottom of my glass and didn’t seem to negatively affect the taste.

Aromas of brown sugar, caramel, light milk chocolate and musty old wood are most pronounced. There’s more of a sweet alcohol tinge on the nose than you’d expect from a rum bottled at 34% ABV (though it’s not objectionable). Slight molasses and sulphur odors add a dry essence that partially offsets the alcohol and sugars, then a light spice, (nutmeg and vanilla), and a hint of fruit (grape, raisin, mango, and banana). The aromas are well integrated, but a moderately complexity enables recognition of the individual components. The initial taste is completely unique amongst aged rums, and is surprisingly different from the aromas. It is sweet with fruit, like a madeira or tawny port, and chewy with a medium-heavy weight body. The finish is thinner than the body, is sweet like sherry on the tongue tip yet fruity on the palate, the caramel disappears and leaves a dry tobacco in the throat, adding to the mystery.

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